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Barrington Atlas Application mentioned in the New York Times

August 25, 2014 in Barrington, Interest, News, Review

0824-BKS-Applied1-tmagSFThe New York Times has favorably reviewed the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World for the iPad. You can read the review here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/books/review/gateways-to-the-classical-world.html

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Cambridge University Press Publishes The Geography of Strabo

August 21, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, E-resource, Publication

 

Strabo ImageDuane W. Roller’s remarkable new English translation of Strabo’s Geography is now available from Cambridge University Press ( ISBN: 9781107038257; e-book ISBN: 9781139950374). To accompany it, the Center has produced a seamless, interactive online map which is accessible free: http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/strabo.  The map is built on the Antiquity À-la-carte interface, and has immense coverage because it plots all the locatable geographical and cultural features mentioned in the 17 books of this fundamentally important Greek source – over 3,000 of them, stretching from Ireland to the Ganges delta and deep into north Africa. In the e-version of the translation, the gazetteer offers embedded hyperlinks to each toponym’s stable URI within the digital module, making it possible to move directly between Strabo’s text and its cartographic realization.  

 

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AWMC Annual Report 2013-2014

June 26, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, API, Interest, News, Pleiades Project, Presentation, Publication, Report, Wall Maps

5-1-13 to 4-30-14 

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER (http://awmc.unc.edu)

Among the projects undertaken by the Center during this very active year two major preoccupations stand out.  One was the initiative to release a series of publicly accessible map tiles suitable for use in almost any web mapping application or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software suite (http://awmc.unc.edu/wordpress/tiles/).  This ambitious goal was achieved early in 2014.  Created from data produced by the Center and generously hosted on Mapbox servers courtesy of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, these map tiles are the first (and, currently, only) geographically accurate base map of the ancient world from Britain to Bactria.  The tiles conform to the broad periodization (Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, Late Antique) presented in the Barrington Atlas.  Inland water, rivers, shorelines and other geographical features are returned so far as possible to their ancient appearance. The neutral presentation enables scholars to represent the physical environment of nearly any ancient society within the vast arc of space spanned.   Also early in 2014 the Center released revised tiles of the Roman road network.  All these new map tiles were rapidly adopted by the Pleiades Project (see below) for its web interface, and by the beta version of Stanford University’s ORBIS Project 2.0 (http://orbis.stanford.edu/v2/index.html).

The new tiles are in turn the building blocks for the Center’s beta version of Antiquity À-la-carte 3.0 in preparation (http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/carte-transitional/).  It should fully replace the current and still-active version 2.0 by the end of next academic year.  Like version 2.0, it is a versatile web-based GIS interface and interactive digital atlas of the ancient Mediterranean world, offering data produced by the Center as well as the entire feature set of its longterm ongoing partner the Pleiades Project (http://pleaides.stoa.org). As with 2.0, users can frame, populate and export maps according to their own design, either selecting the Center’s data or adding their own content, including line work and shading.  In accordance with the Center’s standard operating procedure, all this content is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, permitting free use for non-commercial purposes.

The Center’s other major preoccupation was completion of a seamless, interactive online map to accompany the remarkable new translation into English of Strabo’s massive Geography by Duane W. Roller (The Ohio State University) due for publication in both print and electronic formats by Cambridge University Press in summer 2014.  The map itself is accessible free: http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/strabo.  The map is built on the Antiquity À-la-carte interface, and has immense coverage because it plots all the locatable geographical and cultural features mentioned in the 17 books of this fundamentally important Greek source – over 3,000 of them, stretching from Ireland to the Ganges delta and deep into north Africa.   In the e-version of the translation, the gazetteer offers embedded hyperlinks to each toponym’s stable URI within the digital module, making it possible to move directly between Strabo’s text and its cartographic realization.  While production of this map inevitably presented the Center with technical obstacles, its success in overcoming them has assisted other mapmaking initiatives.  The opportunity for the Center to incorporate the enormous body of Strabo’s geographic information into its API (http://awmc.unc.edu/api) has also been invaluable.

The Center’s wallmap of Asia Minor in the Roman imperial period at 1:750,000 scale (measuring 4 x 6.5 ft) is a longterm project that has presented even more challenges than the Strabo map.  Fortunately, it has at last been brought very close to completion this year.  Richard Talbert exhibited a near-final draft in Ankara, Turkey, at the conference Pathways of Communication: Roads and Routes in Anatolia from Prehistory to Seljuk Times, where it was so favorably received that the British Institute requested permission to keep it on display.  The Center has begun work on a similar map of the Iberian Peninsula at the same scale.

Mapmaking commissions fulfilled by the Center included two maps for Clifford Ando (University of Chicago) to illustrate his research on the Romans’ pacification of North Africa; one plan of Augustan Rome, three plans of Rome and Constantinople in the fourth century AD, and one overview map of the Mediterranean for the forthcoming monograph Sacred Founders (University of California Press) by Diliana Angelova (University of California, Berkeley); one map of the Sasanian Empire in the third century AD for a Brill monograph by Iain Gardner (University of Sydney); and six maps of Eurasia, the Roman empire, Roman North Africa, the barbarian kingdoms, the Iranian world, and central Asia in the fifth century AD for The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila edited by Michael Maas (Rice University).  The Center supplied all 28 maps for the second edition of Mary Boatwright and co-authors, A Brief History of the Romans (Oxford University Press).  In addition, the Center provided an integration of its current map tiles and shapefiles of the Iberian Peninsula, as well as its Peutinger Map files, for the Fall 2013 exhibition at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity. The Center also assisted Princeton University Press in the test stages of its innovative re-issue of the Barrington Atlas as an app for iPad 2.0+.

Richard Talbert gave a lecture at the ISAW exhibition, and a keynote address on mapping Asia Minor at the Ankara conference Pathways of Communication.  At the Chicago annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, Steve Burges (now a graduate student at Boston University) presented a paper “The creation of the Forum Romanum: Three-dimensional mapping and Rome’s flood-prone valley,” incorporating research he had done at the Center for his UNC senior honors thesis last year.  In Chapel Hill, Ross Twele, Ryan Horne and Michael Heubel were chosen to make a presentation at the Historical GIS Student Showcase in April.  The Center also made a poster presentation on Antiquity À-la-carte and its Strabo map for University Research Day.

As hoped, several students who had been working most productively at the Center returned to continue this year.  Ryan Horne again played a major role by taking the lead in the release of all the new map tiles, in the ongoing work on Antiquity À-la-carte 3.0, and in solving the difficulties of presentation faced by the Strabo and Asia Minor maps.  Ray Belanger further expanded the Center’s geodatabase of physical and cultural features derived from the Barrington Atlas.  Luke Hagemann incorporated Greek place names into the database and cross-referenced Strabo’s toponyms with Pleiades IDs.  Two undergraduate students and one graduate (Lindsay Holman) were recruited: Audrey Jo revised the Center’s shoreline geodatabase especially in regions where marked change has occurred since antiquity.  Michael Heubel created a new geodatabase of polyline extents and labels for regions, peoples, tribes and physical features.  Lindsay expanded the geodatabase of rivers courses, in particular to classify them at distinct zoom levels for online viewing.  Audrey, Luke and Ray all graduated, and their loss will be keenly felt, as will that of this year’s exemplary acting director Ross Twele.  He has been tireless, creative, diplomatic, and enviably clear-headed in advancing an array of demanding projects and responsibilities each at a different stage and with its own distinctive needs.  Ross will be succeeded by Ryan Horne.

Ross Twele

Richard Talbert

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Rome’s World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered now in paperback

May 23, 2014 in Uncategorized

Prof. Richard Talbert’s (UNC Chapel Hill) monograph Rome’s World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered is now available in paperback from Cambridge University Press.  The companion website to this study, created by the Ancient World Mapping Center, can be accessed here.

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AWMC presentation at UNC Research Computing Symposium

May 20, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, Interest, News, Presentation

wordleThe University of North Carolina’s ITS Research Computing Group is hosting its first annual Research Computing Symposium today (20 May) at the Carolina Club in the George Watts Hill Alumni Center.  Ryan Horne, incoming Acting Director of the AWMC, will be on hand to display a poster presentation showcasing the Center’s most recent digital humanities work (see our University Research Day post for further details).

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AWMC presentation at HGIS Carolina Student Showcase

April 3, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, Interest, News, Presentation

HGIS Carolina

HGIS Carolina is hosting a Student Showcase today (April 3) from 3:30-5:00p “to allow UNC students to present their work using GIS to study, reconstruct, and visualize the past.”  Ross Twele, Ryan Horne, and Michael Heubel will be presenting portions of the Ancient World Mapping Center’s ongoing work on Antiquity À-la-carte 3.0 under the title “Mapping the Ancient Mediterranean in the Digital Age.”  The 20-minute presentation will draw particular attention to our current project of producing individual shapefiles for regional and tribal names, bridges and aqueducts, and centuriation patterns.

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OpenLayers is down

April 3, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, Benthos, Site Information

It appears that OpenLayers API is down at the moment, causing all of our mapping applications to be inaccessible. We are building a local version of the code library now to ensure that this problem will not happen again, and will post an update here when that task is finished.

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Possible website downtime this afternoon (3/20)

March 20, 2014 in Site Information

The Ancient World Mapping Center server is experiencing a power voltage issue.  We are attempting to correct this problem today (March 20), and in the process there may be about one hour of website downtime this afternoon.

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Ancient World Mapping Center poster at UNC’s University Research Day

March 4, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, Interest, News, Presentation

URD 2014 FlyerThis afternoon, the Ancient World Mapping Center is participating in The University of North Carolina‘s annual University Research Day.  The Center will be displaying a poster collage of our latest research and programming, especially in regard to Antiquity A-la-carte 3.0.  The poster features with special prominence an image of our forthcoming Strabo Online web application in connection with Duane Roller’s new translation of the Geographika for Cambridge University Press.  It also displays images of A-la-carte’s capability to map man-made features according to the Pleiades database and the AWMC’s collection of shapefiles, to represent coastal variations both within periods of ancient history and in contrast to the modern topographical aspect, and to map surviving ancient features at tenths-of-a-second accuracy with the use of handheld GPS devices.   A PDF file of the poster (licensed under a Creative Commons CC BY License) can be seen here.

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International Conference: Pathways of Communication: Roads and Routes in Anatolia from Prehistory to Seljuk Times

February 28, 2014 in Interest, News, Presentation

The British Institute at Ankara, in collaboration with Ankara University, is hosting the conference Pathways of Communication: Roads and Routes in Anatolia from Prehistory to Seljuk Times March 20-22, 2014 on the university campus.  A programme for the conference can be found here.  The conference will devote two panels to “Maps and Digital Mapping” and “Digital Approaches to Roads and Networks.”  Prof. Richard Talbert has been invited to speak in a panel at Pathways on the Ancient World Mapping Center’s most recent efforts in “Digital Mapping of Classical Asia Minor and its Routes: Progress and Prospects”.

 

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