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Cambridge University Press Publishes The Medieval Peutinger Map

September 25, 2014 in Interest, Publication

Emily Albu’s new monograph is forthcoming imminently from Cambridge University Press ( ISBN: 9781107059429), a very handsome volume (we have seen an advance copy).

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Cambridge University Press Publishes The Geography of Strabo

August 21, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, E-resource, Publication

 

Strabo ImageDuane W. Roller’s remarkable new English translation of Strabo’s Geography is now available from Cambridge University Press ( ISBN: 9781107038257; e-book ISBN: 9781139950374). To accompany it, the Center has produced a seamless, interactive online map which is accessible free: http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/strabo.  The map is built on the Antiquity À-la-carte interface, and has immense coverage because it plots all the locatable geographical and cultural features mentioned in the 17 books of this fundamentally important Greek source – over 3,000 of them, stretching from Ireland to the Ganges delta and deep into north Africa. In the e-version of the translation, the gazetteer offers embedded hyperlinks to each toponym’s stable URI within the digital module, making it possible to move directly between Strabo’s text and its cartographic realization.  

 

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AWMC Annual Report 2013-2014

June 26, 2014 in Antiquity À-la-carte, API, Interest, News, Pleiades Project, Presentation, Publication, Report, Wall Maps

5-1-13 to 4-30-14 

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER (http://awmc.unc.edu)

Among the projects undertaken by the Center during this very active year two major preoccupations stand out.  One was the initiative to release a series of publicly accessible map tiles suitable for use in almost any web mapping application or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software suite (http://awmc.unc.edu/wordpress/tiles/).  This ambitious goal was achieved early in 2014.  Created from data produced by the Center and generously hosted on Mapbox servers courtesy of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, these map tiles are the first (and, currently, only) geographically accurate base map of the ancient world from Britain to Bactria.  The tiles conform to the broad periodization (Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, Late Antique) presented in the Barrington Atlas.  Inland water, rivers, shorelines and other geographical features are returned so far as possible to their ancient appearance. The neutral presentation enables scholars to represent the physical environment of nearly any ancient society within the vast arc of space spanned.   Also early in 2014 the Center released revised tiles of the Roman road network.  All these new map tiles were rapidly adopted by the Pleiades Project (see below) for its web interface, and by the beta version of Stanford University’s ORBIS Project 2.0 (http://orbis.stanford.edu/v2/index.html).

The new tiles are in turn the building blocks for the Center’s beta version of Antiquity À-la-carte 3.0 in preparation (http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/carte-transitional/).  It should fully replace the current and still-active version 2.0 by the end of next academic year.  Like version 2.0, it is a versatile web-based GIS interface and interactive digital atlas of the ancient Mediterranean world, offering data produced by the Center as well as the entire feature set of its longterm ongoing partner the Pleiades Project (http://pleaides.stoa.org). As with 2.0, users can frame, populate and export maps according to their own design, either selecting the Center’s data or adding their own content, including line work and shading.  In accordance with the Center’s standard operating procedure, all this content is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, permitting free use for non-commercial purposes.

The Center’s other major preoccupation was completion of a seamless, interactive online map to accompany the remarkable new translation into English of Strabo’s massive Geography by Duane W. Roller (The Ohio State University) due for publication in both print and electronic formats by Cambridge University Press in summer 2014.  The map itself is accessible free: http://awmc.unc.edu/awmc/applications/strabo.  The map is built on the Antiquity À-la-carte interface, and has immense coverage because it plots all the locatable geographical and cultural features mentioned in the 17 books of this fundamentally important Greek source – over 3,000 of them, stretching from Ireland to the Ganges delta and deep into north Africa.   In the e-version of the translation, the gazetteer offers embedded hyperlinks to each toponym’s stable URI within the digital module, making it possible to move directly between Strabo’s text and its cartographic realization.  While production of this map inevitably presented the Center with technical obstacles, its success in overcoming them has assisted other mapmaking initiatives.  The opportunity for the Center to incorporate the enormous body of Strabo’s geographic information into its API (http://awmc.unc.edu/api) has also been invaluable.

The Center’s wallmap of Asia Minor in the Roman imperial period at 1:750,000 scale (measuring 4 x 6.5 ft) is a longterm project that has presented even more challenges than the Strabo map.  Fortunately, it has at last been brought very close to completion this year.  Richard Talbert exhibited a near-final draft in Ankara, Turkey, at the conference Pathways of Communication: Roads and Routes in Anatolia from Prehistory to Seljuk Times, where it was so favorably received that the British Institute requested permission to keep it on display.  The Center has begun work on a similar map of the Iberian Peninsula at the same scale.

Mapmaking commissions fulfilled by the Center included two maps for Clifford Ando (University of Chicago) to illustrate his research on the Romans’ pacification of North Africa; one plan of Augustan Rome, three plans of Rome and Constantinople in the fourth century AD, and one overview map of the Mediterranean for the forthcoming monograph Sacred Founders (University of California Press) by Diliana Angelova (University of California, Berkeley); one map of the Sasanian Empire in the third century AD for a Brill monograph by Iain Gardner (University of Sydney); and six maps of Eurasia, the Roman empire, Roman North Africa, the barbarian kingdoms, the Iranian world, and central Asia in the fifth century AD for The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila edited by Michael Maas (Rice University).  The Center supplied all 28 maps for the second edition of Mary Boatwright and co-authors, A Brief History of the Romans (Oxford University Press).  In addition, the Center provided an integration of its current map tiles and shapefiles of the Iberian Peninsula, as well as its Peutinger Map files, for the Fall 2013 exhibition at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity. The Center also assisted Princeton University Press in the test stages of its innovative re-issue of the Barrington Atlas as an app for iPad 2.0+.

Richard Talbert gave a lecture at the ISAW exhibition, and a keynote address on mapping Asia Minor at the Ankara conference Pathways of Communication.  At the Chicago annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, Steve Burges (now a graduate student at Boston University) presented a paper “The creation of the Forum Romanum: Three-dimensional mapping and Rome’s flood-prone valley,” incorporating research he had done at the Center for his UNC senior honors thesis last year.  In Chapel Hill, Ross Twele, Ryan Horne and Michael Heubel were chosen to make a presentation at the Historical GIS Student Showcase in April.  The Center also made a poster presentation on Antiquity À-la-carte and its Strabo map for University Research Day.

As hoped, several students who had been working most productively at the Center returned to continue this year.  Ryan Horne again played a major role by taking the lead in the release of all the new map tiles, in the ongoing work on Antiquity À-la-carte 3.0, and in solving the difficulties of presentation faced by the Strabo and Asia Minor maps.  Ray Belanger further expanded the Center’s geodatabase of physical and cultural features derived from the Barrington Atlas.  Luke Hagemann incorporated Greek place names into the database and cross-referenced Strabo’s toponyms with Pleiades IDs.  Two undergraduate students and one graduate (Lindsay Holman) were recruited: Audrey Jo revised the Center’s shoreline geodatabase especially in regions where marked change has occurred since antiquity.  Michael Heubel created a new geodatabase of polyline extents and labels for regions, peoples, tribes and physical features.  Lindsay expanded the geodatabase of rivers courses, in particular to classify them at distinct zoom levels for online viewing.  Audrey, Luke and Ray all graduated, and their loss will be keenly felt, as will that of this year’s exemplary acting director Ross Twele.  He has been tireless, creative, diplomatic, and enviably clear-headed in advancing an array of demanding projects and responsibilities each at a different stage and with its own distinctive needs.  Ross will be succeeded by Ryan Horne.

Ross Twele

Richard Talbert

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New “History of Cartography” resource in Oxford Bibliographies Online

December 2, 2013 in E-resource, Interest, News, Publication

Picture 2

Matthew Edney, director of the History of Cartography Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has produced an annotated bibliography on “History of Cartography” for Oxford Bibliographies Online under the subject “Geography”.  This bibliography includes: General Overviews; Overviews by Period and Culture; The Field of Study; Technical Aspects of Map Making; Map Forms; Cartographic Modes or Ways of Acting with Maps; Government, Politics, and Cartography; Commerce, Public Discourse, and Identity Mapping; and Maps and Historical Practice.

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New publication of interest: A Brief History of the Romans, 2nd ed by Boatwright, Gargola, Lenski, and Talbert

October 31, 2013 in Interest, News, Publication

brief_romans_2_ed_coverThe second edition of A Brief History of the Romans by M. T. Boatwright, D. Gargola, N. Lenski, and R. J. A. Talbert is now available from Oxford University Press, featuring new map content generated by the Ancient World Mapping Center.  A companion website, www.oup.com/us/boatwright, is forthcoming.

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Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World for iPad 2+

October 31, 2013 in E-resource, Interest, News, Publication

Home pagePrinceton University Press and the Ancient World Mapping Center are pleased to announce the release of the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World app for iPad 2+ on November 21, 2013.  For the full press release and screenshots of the app, see http://blog.press.princeton.edu/barrington-atlas-of-the-greek-and-roman-world-app-available-november-21-2013/

UPDATE:  The final release date for this app is Monday, December 2.

UPDATE 2:  The Roman archaeology blog [quem dixere chaos] has posted a long review of the app, with several screenshots and summaries of the app’s functionalities.

 

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New publication of interest: Reflectance Transformation Imaging of a ‘Byzantine’ portable sundial by Bevan, Lehoux, and Talbert

September 4, 2013 in Interest, News, Publication

George Bevan and Daryn Lehoux of Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, CA and Richard Talbert of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have published a new article, Reflectance Transformation Imaging of a ‘Byzantine’ portable sundial, in Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 187 (2013).  This article should be of special interest to RTI enthusiasts and to anyone curious about the application of digital photography methods to ancient history and archaeology.  It is an illustration of the remarkable advances that RTI can provide over autopic examination alone.  The article will not be available for Open Access download until one year after initial publication.

UPDATE:  A .pdf file of the article is provided here: ZPE 187-bevan-lehoux-talbert

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New publication of interest: Roman Roads and Roman Society by Feng Ding Xiong

May 14, 2013 in Interest, News, Publication

roman_roads_roman_society_web

Feng Ding Xiong. 2012. Roman Roads and Roman Society. China Social Sciences Press. ISBN-13: 9787516113813.

Chinese scholar Feng Ding Xiong (Zhejiang Ocean University Zhoushan 316000 China) has produced a new monograph entitled Roman Roads and Roman Society that has now been issued by the China Social Sciences Press (pub. date 2012; ISBN-13: 9787516113813). It does not appear that any Western libraries yet hold this title, but a copy kindly sent by the author will be deposited in the library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The Chinese-language monograph does include an English table of contents.

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Tauris re-prints An Atlas of Ancient Geography, Biblical and Classical: Maps of the Ancient World by William Smith

March 28, 2013 in Interest, News, Publication

81ZsbKDSKsL._SL1500_Publisher I. B. Tauris has re-printed William Smith’s landmark nineteenth century work An Atlas of Ancient Geography, Biblical and Classical: Maps of the Ancient World. The new edition includes an introduction written by Richard Talbert. See Tauris’ website for ordering information. The publisher’s description, in part, states “Published to complement his Greek and Roman dictionaries, “An Atlas of Ancient Geography, Biblical and Classical” by Sir William Smith is the rarest and most visually compelling of the volumes. Produced to the highest standard by the leading mapmaker of the day, the maps – large-scale, small-scale, historical, topographical, multiple city plans and other insets – are clear, detailed, intricately colored works of art. “The Atlas” provides the first complete set of maps of the ancient world, both classical and biblical. A full index of names and places, both ancient and modern, accompanies each of the larger maps. For each map there is also an accompanying text, giving sources and authorities for them.”

Hardback

ISBN: 9781848853522
Publication Date: 28 Feb 2013
Number of Pages: 240
Height: 495
Width: 319

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ISAW publishes Hatke Aksum and Nubia: Warfare, Commerce, and Political Fictions in Ancient Northeast Africa (NYU 2013).

March 1, 2013 in Interest, News, Publication

hatke

G. Hatke 2013. Aksum and Nubia: Warfare, Commerce, and Political Fictions in Ancient Northeast Africa (NYU) ISBN: 0-8147-6066-X

A digital monograph from Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) has appeared. George Hatke’s Aksum and Nubia: Warfare, Commerce, and Political Fictions in Ancient Northeast Africa (ISAW NYU 2013) ISBN: 0-8147-6066-X (alk. paper) is available as an e-book and as a traditional print publication. Its topic treats ancient Northeast Africa and includes three custom-made maps produced by AWMC. The electronic version is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution No-derivatives License.

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