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2008-2009 Annual Report

January 26, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

With Elizabeth Robinson continuing as Acting Director and the opportunity to secure Ross Twele as Cartographic Assistant for both semesters, the Center has been able to achieve considerably more this year than originally anticipated. A substantial number of commissions to create custom-designed maps were accepted, in particular a complex group spread over ten pages for a monograph on the Alexandrian geographer and polymath Eratosthenes by Duane Roller (Princeton University Press, forthcoming fall 2009). The year’s principal accomplishment, however, has been a fundamental rethinking of the long delayed ‘wall maps’ project and its advancement at an accelerated pace almost to completion. Former Director Tom Elliott had drafted a prototype map for this project as far back as 2005, and more recently Robinson had made some progress assisted by Cary Barber and UNC GIS Librarian Amanda Henley. Even so, certain major conceptual concerns had still to be resolved and related technical obstacles overcome. In both instances satisfying solutions have now been found and the results are outstanding. In particular, a set of seven maps has been settled upon, with the prospect of others to come left open. Two cover the ancient Near East and Egypt at successive periods, and one each the Aegean, Italy, Alexander the Great’s world, the eastern Mediterranean with special reference to the New Testament, and the Roman empire. All are designed as wall maps for instructors’ use in large survey courses. However, they are also to be offered as digital products for projection, and as such are extraordinarily attractive and versatile. Physical landscape has been painstakingly returned to its ancient appearance, and an effective color palette developed. The sheer quantity of data to be manipulated (the largest map covers 30 sq. ft.) presented a succession of daunting challenges, but these have all been met. No comparable set of large maps for use in ancient history classes exists; the latest published dates to 1989 (just prior to the development of digital cartography) and is no match for the Center’s seven.

The extensive digital map work commissioned by Richard Talbert for the electronic version of his book Rome’s World: the Peutinger Map Reconsidered was completed by Sarah Willis. The book has been delivered to Cambridge University Press and has gone into production. With Talbert as adviser, Gannon Hubbard exploited the unique collection of resources and materials at the Center to develop his History honors thesis “Engravers and mapmakers: two contrasting approaches to reproducing the Peutinger map.”

The Center was associated with the ‘Concordia’ project funded by a NEH/JISC Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grant; this has principally involved the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at King’s College, London, and the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. At the latter, major roles were played by Tom Elliott together with AWMC’s former software developer Sean Gillies. Concordia’s goal has been to prepare approximately one thousand Roman inscribed texts from western Libya (Tripolitania) for publication in association with maps and other research tools, not least as a demonstration of digital interoperability.

At the year’s end Elizabeth Robinson is relinquishing the Acting Directorship in order to pursue dissertation research in Rome and Larino (Molise) with the support of the Archaeological Institute of America’s prestigious Olivia James Traveling Fellowship for 2009-10. Her initiative, efficiency and multiple talents will be much missed. Brian Turner takes her place; having previously worked for the ongoing Pleiades project, he is already familiar with many of the Center’s activities. Ross Twele is taking up a departmental teaching assistantship, but expects to continue some mapmaking work at the Center.

Elizabeth Robinson, Richard Talbert

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2006-2007 Annual Report

January 26, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

This year the Center has notably advanced its goals and was particularly pleased to demonstrate its ongoing activities to a large group of enthusiastic W.P. Cummings Map Society members during their fall annual meeting. Acting Director Dr Jeffrey Becker has begun to develop the set of wall-maps projected in the 2005 conference panel “Ancient Geography for the Twenty-First Century Classroom” organized by Richard Talbert. This set of papers (by Talbert, former Center Director Tom Elliott, and three other speakers) is now published online in the 2006 Occasional Papers of the American Philological Association’s Committee on Ancient History. Becker has also completed the mapping component commissioned by Prof. Patrick Sims-Williams for the Ancient Celtic Placenames of Europe project based at Aberystwyth, Wales. Undergraduate assistants Graham Shepherd and Gannon Hubbard have worked to complete major components of Talbert’s electronic presentation of Peutinger’s Roman Map.

The NEH-funded Pleiades project [pleiades.stoa.org], managed by Tom Elliott, is progressing as planned to develop an online workspace for ancient geography. The system created by Elliott and software developer Sean Gillies now incorporates a subset of Barrington Atlas data, and permits online mapping as well as controlled editing of geographic names and integration with Google Earth. Graduate research assistant Brian Turner is enhancing the Barrington Atlas data by the insertion of primary source data and Greek orthography for names. Software design for bibliographic data and advanced geographic functions are on schedule for deployment in fall 2007. In consultation with key institutions and cognate projects elsewhere in North America and Europe, Elliott is planning the establishment of a common framework and standards for data exchange and online mapping across the entire field of ancient studies. Through its Pleiades project in particular, the Center would take the lead in this major, longterm initiative. Maps created by the Center continue to be in widespread demand for reproduction and adaptation. Talbert has begun discussions with Princeton University Press for the publication of a digital edition of the Barrington Atlas.

After a year of sterling service to the Center, Jeffrey Becker is now leaving to take up a visiting appointment in archaeology at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA. He will be succeeded in the fall by Elizabeth Robinson, doctoral student in Classics, whose special skills include experience in survey archaeology and use of GIS.

Richard Talbert, Director

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2005-2006 Annual Report

January 26, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

This has been a year of successful transition for the Center, set in motion above all by the award of full funding ($389,883) by the National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access Division (Research and Development) for a two-year project to create Pleiades: an Online Workspace for Ancient Geography. Built atop the open-source Plone Content Management System, and web-hosted by the Stoa Consortium at the University of Kentucky, Pleiades is designed to provide eventual on-line access to all information about Greek and Roman geography assembled by the Classical Atlas Project for the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. At the same time Pleiades enables large-scale collaboration in order to maintain and diversify this dataset. Through an innovative combination of internet technology, open-content approaches (resembling those used by Wikipedia) and rigorous academic editorial review, Pleiades empowers anyone – from established experts to informed students of antiquity – to contribute new knowledge and insights, descriptive essays, bibliographic updates, geographic coordinates, and more. After approval by an international Steering Committee of established experts, these contributions become a permanent, author-attributed part of future publications and data services at the Center. More broadly, Pleiades is intended to serve as a model for the many other fields in the humanities and social sciences that face the problem of keeping immense bodies of fundamental reference materials current. For further information, visit http://www.unc.edu/awmc/

Richard Talbert serves as Principal Investigator for the Pleiades Project as well as Acting Director of the Center. Tom Elliott has relinquished this directorship in order to take a full-time leading role in the development of Pleiades. A highly qualified Software Applications Analyst, Sean Gillies, has been hired to work alongside him. The Center Director’s position is to be filled as soon as practicable, subject as always to funding.

The work of the Center in general, and of Pleiades in particular, formed the subject of a special feature by Barrymore Scherer in The Wall Street Journal on March 1, timed to coincide with National Humanities Day 2006. Graham Shepherd and David O’Brien have continued to contribute to preparation of Richard Talbert’s Peutinger Map database, which is now nearing completion after overcoming multiple complexities and obstacles. Last but not least, the Center’s website and the maps available there receive as heavy worldwide use as ever, resulting in warm expressions of appreciation from all sides.

Richard Talbert, Director

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2004-2005 Annual Report

January 26, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

The College of Arts and Sciences, together with the Departments of History and Classics, continue to provide essential support for core operations of the Ancient World Mapping Center while our endowment fund matures. These bridging funds permit the Center to expand its unique role in promoting cartography, historical geography and geographic information science worldwide as essential disciplines within the field of ancient studies. Moreover, this support ensures that the Center will live up to the evident potential acknowledged by generous endowment contributions from Carolina alumni like Jim Alexandre and Mark Clein, as well as the Stavros S. Niarchos, Barrington, Gladys Krieble Delmas and Samuel H. Kress foundations, which are matched by funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. What follows here is a brief summary of the year’s advances.

This past spring, TOM ELLIOTT contributed to the History Department’s undergraduate teaching mission by leading a 120-student section of History 14, which surveys the ancient histories of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. Incorporating a significant geographic component into the course – and benefiting greatly from the assistance of two outstanding teaching assistants (Jacob Burt and Joshua Westgard) – Dr. Elliott enjoyed leading his students through 8,000 years of history on three different continents. Continuing the Center’s tradition of high-quality contributions to pedagogy at Carolina and beyond, Dr. Elliott presented a paper at the spring meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South in which he outlined the Center’s plans for a new, high-quality series of classroom wall maps for ancient history. The presentation, together with a large prototype map of “Julio-Claudian Italy,” generated significant interest and positive comments. The Center has opened preliminary collaboration discussions with the cartographic unit at MapQuest.com. Dr. Elliott’s paper is scheduled for publication in The Occasional Papers of the American Philological Association’s Committee on Ancient History. The prototype map was also a central focal point of the display mounted by Richard Talbert for National Humanities Advocacy Day 2005 in Washington, D.C.

The Center’s contributions to research also accelerated during the past year. Work in progress includes: digital and print publications of ancient documents, a project to map the incidence of identifiable Celtic place names and personal names in surviving Greek and Roman documents, and a potential project involving Roman roads in Asia Minor. In conjunction with these projects, Dr. Elliott presented at workshops and participated in panel discussions at New York University (epigraphic documents from Aphrodisias in Turkey), the British School in Rome (databases of ancient Roman documents) and Duke University (the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri). He also played key roles in the planning of colloquia to be held in the coming year at Brown University and the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften. The Center also expanded its involvement in Talbert’s research project on Peutinger’s Roman map by providing computational resources, technical oversight and cartographic development. One of the Center’s undergraduate cartographic technicians is presently collaborating with Talbert and Elliott to produce a high-quality modern map detailing the ancient map’s content. Procedures developed at the Center for digitizing the maps and data from the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World are now moving into an operational mode; distribution discussions with Princeton University Press and the American Philological Association are slated for fall 2005. Dr. Elliott has opened preliminary consultation with staff members at the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, where he has been named an External Fellow, on a collaborative effort to produce high quality maps of the city of Rome. The Center continues to seek grant funding for the Pleiades Project, which will create an international community of scholars, teachers, students and enthusiasts to collaborate in updating and expanding the spatial and historical reference information maintained by the Center.

Between 1 July 2004 and 1 June 2005, the Map Center’s website logged over 300,000 discrete visitors (not counting automated web search systems), with a weekday average of nearly 1,000 visitors per day. As in previous years, these visitors hailed from all over the globe, with the top ten countries being the U.S.A., Hungary, Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, Australia, Germany, Italy, France and the Netherlands. The most visited portion of the website remains the “Maps for Students” section, which provides free, high-quality maps for educational purposes. In the past year, Dr. Elliott added a number of the maps he prepared for his History 14 class to the collection. We regularly receive emails from “Maps for Students” users, suggesting new maps to include and thanking us for the materials we make available, for example:

I would like to thank you for publishing on-line maps of such high quality. I study archaeology at Belgrade University, in Serbia. My university is poorly supplied, and I couldn’t get a precise idea of the late Roman empire in geographical scale until now. Thank you so much for your help. – M.D

Tom Elliott, Director

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2003-2004 Annual Report

January 26, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

Through the generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Departments of History and Classics, the National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program and foundation and private donors, the Center continues to mature, enhancing its capacity to assist scholars and students around the world with cartographic and geographic projects. What follows here is a brief summary of the year’s highlights.

The Center has secured the agreement of Princeton University to conduct an “audience test” of digital versions of maps prepared for the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. The test is intended to further our goal of producing a Digital Barrington Atlas. The Center will report its recommendation for this product to the Press and to the American Philological Association in the first part of 2005.

During the first quarter of 2004, the Center added twenty-eight new maps relating to central themes in Roman history to its “Maps for Students Map Room.” These maps are available for free download and free reproduction and redistribution for non-profit personal and educational reasons. The maps were prepared to accompany the new book by Mary T. Boatwright, Daniel J. Gargola and Richard J.A. Talbert, The Romans from Village to Empire, Oxford University Press, 2004 (ISBN: 0-19-511875-8).

Prof. Richard Talbert and Dr. Elliott have submitted a grant proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund creation of the Pleiades Project: a functioning, international community of scholars, teachers, students and enthusiasts who will collaborate in updating the expansion of the spatial and historical reference information assembled by the Classical Atlas Project and taken over by the Center.

The Center’s impact in the Carolina classroom continues to expand. Prof. Talbert’s graduate seminar, co-taught with Prof. Grant Parker of Duke University, drew eleven motivated students from UNC-CH, Duke, UNC-Greensboro and North Carolina State University. Dr. Elliott’s undergraduate seminar on “Roman Roads and Land Travel” drew nine talented undergraduates, who were equally successful in their explorations of related questions, as well as the use of aerial photography and geographical information systems.

The coming year is critically important for the success of the Center’s endowment drive, part of the Carolina first campaign. $700,000 in contributions and pledges must be secured in order to an additional $175,000 in matching funds from the National Endowment from the Humanities. Success in reaching this goal will secure perpetual support for the position of Center director and for basic budget needs such as phone and postage.

Tom Elliott, Director

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2002-2003 Annual Report

January 24, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

The 2002-2003 ancient year has been a busy and successful one for the Ancient World Mapping Center. Several efforts have seen significant advancement including our Maps for Students Project, which publishes free educational maps via the world-wide wide (www.unc.edu/awmc/downloads) and our collaboration with the Department of Computer Science to develop a multimedia map use system for the visually impaired (www.cs.unc.edu/Research/assist/bats). New features have also been added to the AWMC website including a weekly “books received” section. Web site traffic statistics indicate that web-publication is effective: the site receives an average of 200 substantive visits (5 or more pages viewed) per day, with 60% of those users spending more than 5 minutes on the site.

We continue to make good progress in establishing an infrastructure for the maintenance and regular update of the information originally published in the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. The Center’s website now provides nine substantive update notices. Some thirty more are in preparation. The Center is now capable of preparing digital images of the Barrington Atlas maps with a high degree of color fidelity and with significantly smaller file sizes that improve system performance. The Center has also been successful in registering these images for use in geographic information systems (GIS). We are presently working with Princeton University Press and the American Philological to plan for the release of a Digital Barrington Atlas. We have recently begun the conversion of the Atlas Project’s bibliographic records and the transfer of Map-by-Map Directory information to a database, with completion expected by the end of summer 2004.

The Center is also contributing to Carolina’s teaching mission. Maps for Students maps are in use in a number of History and Classics courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. We provided a customized map of Roman Spain for use in a graduate epigraphy course in Fall 2002. In the spring term of 2004, Professors Talbert and Grant Parker (Duke University Classics) will be teaching a concurrent research graduate seminar on the theme Space and Place in the Ancient World. The Center’s director, Tom Elliott, will also be teaching an undergraduate research course on “Roman Roads, Itineraries and Land Travel,” partially funded by the Department of History.

We continue to make good progress in developing an endowment to support the Center’s core operations and staff. Major gifts this fiscal year were provided by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and UNC-CH alumnus Mark Clein. We also received the second installment in a three-year pledge from the Stavros S. Niarchos Foundation, as well as numerous smaller donations. We are grateful for their essential support. Next year’s target is the largest yet: $750,000. Reaching this target will release an additional $187,500 from our National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant, and these funds together will permit the Center to operate the following year without direct support from the College. Donors and supporters at all levels are eagerly sought. Interested parties may contact Tom Elliott at awmc@unc.edu or (919) 962-0502.

More information about the Center’s activities and fundraising efforts may be found on the website at www.unc.edu./awmc.

Tom Elliott

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2001-2002 Annual Report

January 24, 2018 in Report

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER

The past year has been an excellent growth year for the Ancient World Mapping Center with important advances made in several areas.

Institutional and private donations have brought our endowment total to within $7,000 of our first-year goal of $83,000, and we are confident of closing that gap by 31 July 2002. The goal for 2003 (essential to secure matching funds through an NEH Challenge Grant) is much higher: $400,000. Information about our endowment drive and how to make contributions can be found on our website (see below).

A collaborative effort between the Center’s Director, Tom Elliott, and Professor Gary Bishop, Department of Computer Science, has led to the creation of a computer system that makes historical maps accessible to the blind using touch, sound and synthesized speech. The prototype system was developed by undergraduate students in a software engineering course, working closely with Tom, Gay and Jason Morris, a blind Classics graduate student assigned as a research assistant to the AWMC for academic year 2002-2003. The project, which used geographic data derived from the Barrington Atlas, edited by History Professor Richard Talbert, was so successful that the Facilities Services Division is now assessing the feasibility of using it to provide up-to-date maps of campus construction zones for the benefit of blind students, and faculty. The project has also gained the attention of researchers at the Microsoft Corporation, who have provided a gift of $24,000 to the Computer Science Department to continue work over the summer. We are now seeking funding for academic year 2002-2003 to enhance the device and develop more historical maps–keyed to UNC undergraduate courses–for use in the system. A story about the project appears in the University Gazette (June 13) (http://gazette.unc.edu/research.html#fy).

We are also hard at work developing procedures for the digitization of maps, bibliography, and other materials assembled under Richard Talbert’s direction by the Classical Atlas Project. We have overcome a number of technical challenges and now believe that we are in position to begin the work in earnest. Summer and Fall 2003 will be spent refining methods and developing proposals to secure funding to support this important initiative. Once the digitization project is complete, the Center will be able to respond quickly to requests for specialized maps for courses and research, and to manage effectively the essential effort to maintain an up-to-date record of research into ancient historical geography.

Visit the AWMC on the web at: www.unc.edu/awmc. Contact via email: awmc@unc.edu

Richard Talbert

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2000-2001 Annual Report

January 24, 2018 in Report

ATLAS OF THE GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD

In May, project director and editor Richard Talbert joined two experts from MapQuest.com and a designer from Princeton University Press to oversee the press run for the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World at Eurografica’s printing plant near Vincenza, Italy. Since the presses run 24 hours a day, with a new ‘form’ emerging for inspection every two hours on average, this task permitted little sleep for a week, but the high quality of presentation achieved for all 180 folio map pages is evident in the finished product. The Atlas was published in September, and has been received with acclaim; press coverage locally, nationally and internationally proved extensive. With its mission completed, the Classical Atlas Committee of the sponsor, the American Philological Association (chaired by Richard Talbert), held its final meeting in January. In February, the Atlas volume won an award for professional/scholarly publishing from the Association of American Publishers. In less than a year, the print run of 5,000 is selling out, and a reprint has been ordered. The printed two-volume set of the accompanying 1,400-page Map-by-Map Directory has likewise sold faster than anticipated (this is an optional extra to the CD-ROM version automatically supplied with every Atlas). The H.W. Goldsmith, A.W. Mellon and Joukowsky Family Foundations each contributed $25,000 to meeting the project’s final costs.

As the Barrington Atlas neared completion, it became clear to everyone involved that the tremendous step forward represented by the Atlas was, in fact, just the critical first step toward an exciting array of teaching and research opportunities that now lie open for investigation, thanks to ongoing advances in technology, historical scholarship, and archaeological survey. The missing component was a permanent academic center chartered to promote cartography, geographic information science and historical geography as essential disciplines within the field of ancient studies. In 1998 Prof. Talbert first outlined to APA his vision of such a Center. The Association’s Board of Directors was eager to be involved with the initiative, but was not in a position to take the lead in establishing it. By contrast, when the possibility was raised, the College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-CH enthusiastically offered to take this lead. With additional financial and administrative support from the Department of History, the Ancient World Mapping Center was established in August 2000. Under the leadership of Director, Tom Elliott, the Center occupies ideal rent-free space on the fifth floor of Davis Library, specially renovated and equipped for the purpose. The Center is already embarking on an exciting array of research and outreach activities, which are summarized on its web site at http://www.unc.edu/depts/awmc. Plans for providing training support to college and secondary teachers are proceeding in cooperation with the History Department’s Project for Historical Education and the North Carolina Classical Association.

In October, Professor Talbert and Mr. Elliott made a joint presentation on the development and production of the Barrington Atlas at the North American Cartographic Information Society annual meeting, Knoxville, TN. In November, Risa Palm, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences hosted a celebration in Wilson Library to mark the successful publication of the Barrington Atlas and the establishment of the AWMC. This celebration, supported by the Departments of History and Classics, featured remarks by Chancellor James Moeser, Dean Palm, and Professor Talbert. April saw the preparation of a proposal to the Challenge Grant program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The AWMC is seeking $500,000 from the NEH to form the cornerstone of a $2.5 million endowment; if approved, the funds will be released to the endowment at a ratio of one dollar to every four raised from other sources. The goal of the endowment is to secure permanent, non-appropriated funding for the core staff, operations, and outreach activities of the Center, thereby insulating it from fluctuations in annual appropriate budgets and freeing College funds for other initiatives. The AWMC received excellent support from the College in preparation of the proposal and has a commitment from Dean Palm and the Arts and Sciences Foundation for the fundraising effort. To learn more about the endowment drive, please contact the Center’s Director at awmc@unc.edu

Richard Talbert

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1999-2000 Annual Report

January 24, 2018 in Report

ATLAS OF THE GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD

For information on this project and on how to order the publications now available, please visit its Web Page at http://www.unc.edu/depts/cl_atlas. In what has been the most stressful of its 12 hectic years to date, the project has now finally achieved completion. Relief at attaining this elusive goal has been tempered, however, by feelings of loss as several staff members moved on to new challenges. After handling all second proof corrections as ably as ever, map editor Dr. Joann McDaniel left during the summer for an appointment at the Inter-Collegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, Italy. Susan Jenny also left then, having served as project manager since the establishment of the office in February 1992. It would be hard to overstate what an immense benefit her dedication and efficiency have been throughout. Brian Lund left for Washington, DC, at the end of January, after making an exceptionally valuable contribution to the Map-by-Map Directory which accompanies the Atlas. With the fulfillment of the major individual donor’s million-dollar pledge, it was confirmed that the volume will be entitled Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World in accordance with his wishes. Front matter for it was delivered to Princeton University Press in December. Early in February the cartographers (MapQuest, Mountville, PA) completed delivery of final film and discs for the printing (in May) of all 180 folio map pages by Eurografica, Vincenza, Italy. In February, too, the project office was able to deliver to Princeton the gazetteer which forms the final component of the atlas volume. Even this simple listing of all the names appearing on the maps runs to 43 pages in five-column format. Its compilation was primarily the work of Tom Elliott. From February onwards he likewise played a major (and outstandingly creative) role in preparing the Directory both as a CD-ROM and as a file for printing. It was delivered at the end of April, and in print will comprise two volumes totaling 1,400 pages. All purchases of the atlas automatically receive the CD-ROM Directory with it.

Director Richard Talbert exhibited maps from the atlas at the 18th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Athens, Greece, during July, and offered both a paper and an exhibit at the 11th International Conference of Classical Studies in Kavala, Greece, in August. He exhibited the entire 102 maps for the atlas at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association and Archaeological Institute of America in Dallas, TX, during December, and likewise at the Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South in Knoxville, TN, in April. He gave a keynote retrospective address on the project at the University of New Brunswick’s (Fredericton, Canada) 7th Annual Ancient History Colloquium in March, and lectured on various aspects of his mapmaking to the UNC Scholarly Communication Working Group (November), the University of Florence, Italy (March), and the Washington Map Society at the Library of Congress (April). An article by him in Mercator’s World (November/December 1999) discusses the project’s goals and development.

Concern that the work of the project should not simply cease with the publication of the atlas has been met by plans for establishment of a permanent center to extend, update, and disseminate what has been achieved so far. The College of Arts and Sciences has made a generous commitment to provide the basic funding for this unique new Ancient World Mapping for three years, and to house it in the Davis Library from Fall 2000. The Partner’s Fund and the American Philological Association are also contributed initial funding.

Richard Talbert

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2016-2017 Annual Report

August 1, 2017 in Report

5-1-2016 to 4-30-2017

ANCIENT WORLD MAPPING CENTER (http://awmc.unc.edu)

Yet again this has been an extremely active year at the Center, with the production of multiple commissioned maps, the completion of several projects initiated by the Center itself, and the formation of a new partnership to apply historical mapping technology to the public good.

The level of commissioned work reached an all-time high.  Notably, the Center produced three maps for Brill’s Companion to Military Defeat in Ancient Mediterranean Society (ed. Brian Turner and Jessica Clark), six maps for Damian Fernandez, An Invisible Class in a Silent Land: Aristocracy and Statehood in Western Iberia, three maps for Simon Pulleyn’s edition of Odyssey, Book I, and two maps for James O’Hara’s commentary on Aeneid, Book VIII.  Illustration of Richard Talbert’s Eitner lecture at the David Rumsey Map Center called for the delicate task of identifying and marking routes attributed to named travelers on sample sheets of Richard Kiepert’s Karte von Kleinasien.

The Center continued its longstanding collaboration with the Pleiades Project at New York University, developing partnerships with several individuals and organizations to expand the focus of the Pleiades gazetteer both spatially (into the Middle and Far East) and temporally (into Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages).

After several years of work by five successive directors of the Center and many others, it has finally been possible to release the magnificent wall map Asia Minor in the Second Century C.E. (1:750,000).  This is a larger-scale successor to the painstaking map by John Anderson (1903) and to its partial revision by William Calder and George Bean (1958).  Offered as a free digital download, the wall map has gained wide interest among archaeologists, cartographers, historians, and scholars of religion; it may also be printed (80 x 50 ins full-size).  The Center has now taken the further step of establishing a new series entitled Maps for Texts: it is designed to provide accurate, high-quality maps for a variety of ancient writings which merit that enhancement (although probably in most cases this was always lacking).  The series has been inaugurated with four maps to accompany Ptolemy’s Table of Important Cities; two of the four adopt Ptolemy’s own projection using a base kindly shared by Alfred Stückelberger and colleagues, who drew it for their 2006 Basel edition of the Geography.  All four maps are offered as free digital downloads.  Next in the series, and close to completion, is an interactive web-map of Hierokles’ Synekdemos,  Further texts due to be mapped in the series include Arrian’s Periplus of the Black Sea, the geographical books (2–6) of Pliny the Elder’s Natural History, the Parthian Stations of Isidore of Charax, and the papyrus record of the journey of Theophanes.

This year the Center launched a new partnership for scholarship in the public interest, focusing on the role of mapping in protecting cultural heritage from human destruction.  Working with the United States Committee for the Blue Shield, the Center expanded and developed “no-strike lists”, inventories of cultural heritage sites (such as schools, libraries and archaeological excavations) in active or potential war zones.  USCBS coordinates with the United States and allied militaries to protect these sites from inadvertent or malicious destruction.  The hard work of Alexander Griffin, in his senior year the Center’s first Cultural Heritage Protection intern, was indispensable to developing this partnership in collaboration with the History Department.

The work of the Center’s other staff members has also been excellent – two graduate students (Lindsay Holman and Peter Raleigh), and two undergraduates (Daniel Hawke and Laura Roberson).  After two years as assistant in the Center, Daniel is now graduating, and will be much missed.  So, too, will former Director Ryan Horne, whose continuing expert assistance during his postdoctoral fellowship has been invaluable; Ryan is moving to a similar position at the University of Pittsburgh.  Gabriel Moss, having most successfully completed a second year as Director, is now stepping down in order to return to the classroom.  He will be succeeded by Lindsay Holman.

Gabriel Moss

Richard Talbert

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